• LDAU

HELPFUL GUIDE FOR PARENTS LOOKING FOR THE BEST WAY TO HELP A CHILD STRUGGLING WITH ATTENTION ISSUES

Eileen Jacobson


The FDA labels are great for parents wanting to improve the quality of food for their families. Certainly, Fruit Loops don’t look like a health food, but some other foods are more deceptive. Good labeling brings all of that to light, allowing a parent to make the right choices for his or her family.


Psychiatric labels, or diagnoses, are not as clear cut. The ADHD label is one of those. It is often applied by teachers or doctors who have full schedules and don’t always have a lot of information about different kinds of attention difficulties. If the diagnosis is inaccurate, it can lead to problems down the line, when the label is used to find treatment solutions.


The information that helps me decide on the right protocol for neurofeedback can also be helpful for parents looking for the best way to help a child struggling with attention issues. It changes the focus to the broader context of the child’s functioning. These possible categories can guide parents in choosing useful ways to intervene.


  • Sleepy Brain: This child doesn’t look sleepy, but his brain tends to make more “sleepy” or “daydreaming” waves than alert, focused waves. Concentrating on something, especially something boring, quickly taxes his ability to focus. He can be especially creative, often happy, impulsive, distractible and easily bored. He may move perpetually in an attempt to focus.


  • Overstimulated Brain: This child’s brain doesn’t sort information well or “dial down” information that is irrelevant, creating a sensitivity to light, sound, physical discomfort, and chaos. Emotional meltdowns can happen when the child becomes overwhelmed.